My very own banana plant

I’ll admit without any hesitation that the banana plant is my favorite plant. So much, that I had planted one in my shared community garden, even though my master gardener did not recommend it for reasons I came to know only later.

When it started growing tall, folks that run the community garden objected saying it was creating a shade that was not good for the other plants to grow under. They wanted me to get rid of it,  but instead I dug it out one day (all 3.5 feet of it) by myself, put it in a large pot, shoved it into the trunk of my car and drove it home (it was very messy – I had to do a lot of cleaning later, but it was worth it).

I dug a hole in my backyard, stuck the plant in there, added some soil and literally forgot about it. Now, in just 3 months, it is almost 5 feet tall and growing with abandon – no fertilizer, no insecticides. Guess, the tropical Florida weather helps.

The reason this is my favorite plant is that not only is it so easy to grow in warm weather areas, but almost every part of it has a use. The leaves are used to serve meals on, in South India – this is still a very active practice at restaurants and weddings. Raw bananas are cooked – there are curries (check out our Raw Plantain Curry), chips, fried bananas, you name it. The stem is used in recipes as well – check out our Banana Stem Curry recipe). Even the banana flower is cooked – check out our very delicious Banana Flower Curry. And of course, you know the banana fruit. So delicious and healthy!

Can you think of any other plant that is so versatile? Probably not. Well, maybe the coconut tree (the fronds are used to cover roofs, the trunk is dug-out to use as a canoe, and of course, the versatile coconut is used in a myriad ways, including the water). Spent coconut shells make for great artifacts too. More details on another post…

Baked Raw Banana Nuggets

My mom makes a fried version of this recipe and I can’t get enough of it when I visit India. She makes it at least twice during my typical 10-day visit. Yes, fried stuff is not great for health, but the occasional indulgence is OK. Now, I wanted to have this more often, so I decided to make it as healthy as I possibly could, without sacrificing the taste. I did all the prep work and then instead of frying it, I decided to make use of my oven to bake it.

It took me a few trials to get the right temperature, duration etc. but I finally nailed it, so I’ll share this version with you. I must confess, it is not as delicious as the fried version, it is pretty close and most importantly, much healthier. Worth the compromise, right?

The Flours Used in the Recipe:

Chickpea flour is made from dried chickpeas (garbanzo beans) and is also commonly known as garbanzo flour, gram flour, and besan. Chickpea flour is a staple of Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi cuisines. Naturally gluten-free, it’s also high in protein, iron and fiber.

Rice flour is a great substitute for wheat flour, since most wheat flour contains gluten — a protein that can irritate the digestive system or worse for anyone who is gluten intolerant. On the positive side, it’s high in fiber and may protect the liver. If you can find sprouted variety, go for it.

Both flours are available online or in any ethnic grocery store.

 

 

Print Recipe
Baked Raw Banana Nuggets
This recipe is a baked version of the traditionally fried, savory raw banana nuggets. While not compromising much on the taste, this baked version makes for a healthy snack between meals or a great cocktail snack.
Why is this Healthy?Nutritionally, raw banana is a good source of fiber, vitamins and minerals, and contains a starch that may help control blood sugar, manage weight and lower blood cholesterol levels.
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
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Course Side, Snack
Cuisine Indian, South
Prep Time 10 Minutes
Cook Time 30 Minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Course Side, Snack
Cuisine Indian, South
Prep Time 10 Minutes
Cook Time 30 Minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Add to Meal Plan:
This recipe has been added to your Meal Plan
Add to Shopping List
This recipe is in your Shopping List
Share this Recipe
Instructions
Prep instructions:
  1. 1. Peel the skin off raw banana and cut to inch size cubes 2. Cook them under high pressure for 15 minutes (IP or pressure cooker) 3. In a small mortar pestle, crush green chili pepper 4. Add chickpea and rice flour, raw onion, crushed chili pepper, salt, oil and a 1/4 cup of water to the cooked banana and mix well, turning it into a coarse mush (not watery)
Bake instructions:
  1. 1. Make patties of the batter with your hands (flat and round) and set them on a foil (with oil spread on it) evenly spaced 2. Cover the tray with more foil 3. Set oven to a temperature of 400 C and bake for 20 minutes 4. Remove the foil cover from the tray, set oven to broil (low) for 10 minutes (make sure you recycle the aluminum foil or reuse it)
  2. Make sure the nuggets are evenly brown and crisp on the surface before pulling them out.
  3. Transfer to a serving dish and serve hot.
Recipe Notes

Eat as a snack by itself anytime.

*Use organic ingredients wherever possible

Nutrition Facts
Baked Raw Banana Nuggets
Amount Per Serving
Calories 114 Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4g 6%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 248mg 10%
Potassium 331mg 9%
Total Carbohydrates 20g 7%
Dietary Fiber 2g 8%
Sugars 9g
Protein 2g 4%
Vitamin A 2%
Vitamin C 25%
Calcium 1%
Iron 3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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